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Redhawks Athletics

Goshen High School

Redhawks Athletics

Goshen High School

Tip of the Week


IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (4-23-18)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Sometimes off-season workouts can become boring and monotonous. With summer approaching, have you given any thought as to how you will approach your training and conditioning while not being in school?

Call it the buddy system if you wish, but working out with a teammate, brother or sister, or an up and coming underclassman, makes the time go faster and the hard work seem easier.

So whether it's heading to the gym for individual workouts, or out running for conditioning, or heading to the weight room for your weight training, try to find someone with similar goals to workout with you.

By finding that right person, you can hold each other accountable and reach your full potential while still having fun and trying to make each other better!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (4-16-18)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

With the end of the school year only five or six weeks away, all student-athletes should be thinking about finishing strong in the classroom.

This time of year it is so easy to look ahead to summer. However, don't forget about the importance of your grades. The last weeks of school are just as important as the first few, so don't let your grade point average slip. Think of the end of the school year like it's the end of a ballgame. Don't let all the hard work disappear in a one or two week period.

Whether you play a spring sport or not, the next few weeks could determine a college choice down the road. Don't look back next year (whether you are a senior or underclass man) and say if my grades were better last year I could be attending the college of my choice!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (2-4-18)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Philadelphia Eagles' quarterback Nick Foles went from backup quarterback to Super Bowl MVP by beating the favored New England Patriots this past weekend. However, what you might not know is that Foles, a six year jorneyman player, almost gave up the game a few years back, contemplating quitting altogether.

Foles was forced into action late in the year when starter Carson Wentz went down with a knee injury. Foles took advantage of the opportunity and never looked back.

In high school, college, or professional sports, as a substitute player you are only one play away from becoming a starter. Whether it's an injury to a player, a coaching decision, or a new coach with a different philosophy, you must stay physically and mentally ready to play when you get your chance.

The next time you find yourself sitting on the bench or not playing as much as you would like, think about Nick Foles. Quitting will get you no where, but continuing to work hard for your opportunity and staying ready for your chance might end up very rewarding!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (1-29-18)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

When I watch or attend a big sporting event, I often wonder to myself what separates the winners from the losers? Is it preparation? Is it coaching? Is it ability?

Whether it is a team sport, or competitors going at it in tennis or golf, when two teams or two individuals are of equal abilities on a given day, I believe the difference maker comes down to COMPOSURE.

When the going gets tough and the game or match is on the line, I will take the team or individual that shows the most composure every time. While you won't win every game or match, the percentages are with you more if you keep your composure and stay focused on the end result.

Next time you are in a tight contest or you are watching one on television, pay close attention to the teams and individuals who look composed and confident with their mind and body language. More than likely, you are looking at the WINNER!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (1-22-18)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Winning in team sports requires constant practice to make sure that every player is in tune with what is best for the entire team. This is very important, but believing this will transpire into victories is just as important.

Big Ten basketball leader Ohio State started the conference with eight straight wins, none more important than beating #1 Michigan State on the road. OSU player Jae'Sean Tate spoke for his team after that big win.

"We all knew we could do it. And that's where it all started. You can't go into a game against a team like Michigan State not believing that it's possible to win. I think that's the biggest factor of us winning tonight, just the belief that we could do it."

Preparation will help insure that you have a chance to win any game on any given night. However, truly believing that you can win is what separates big wins from tough losses!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (1-15-18)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Alabama won the national championship in college football this past week, but the real story is about the two quarterbacks, Jalen Hurts and Tua Tagovailoa, and how they worked together to make it happen.

Hurts, who led Alabama to the final game as a freshman last season, and who has only lost two games as a two year starter, was replaced at halftime (not because of injury) by the seldom used Tagovailoa.

To see Jalen Hurts on the sideline, still engaged and pulling for his team and his backup quarterback, was the inspirational story of the game. Hurts didn't pout, he didn't sulk, he didn't hang his head. What he did was support his replacement, encouraged his teammates, and stayed engaged in the game.

Years from now Alabama fans will still be talking about the tremendous second half rally led by Tua Tagovailoa.  However, I will never forget seeing a star player standing on the sidelines, being replaced in the biggest game of the year, and how he responded with class, grace and humility!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (1-8-18)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Indiana University basketball recruit Robert Phinisee, a senior guard at McCutheon H.S. In Lafayette, is having an outstanding senior season. He still describes his game as a work in progress, and according to the Indy Star he continues to work hard and stay focused.

"I'm still improving every day and trying to get better every day. I'm listening to my coach. We're trying to get better as a team. I'm just trying to work hard in practice and improve my game. When I go, the team goes."

Regardless of the sport, successful athletes and successful teams can't rest on their last game or latest statistics. How is the best way to remain on top?

Phinisee has the right answer. Always strive to improve, listen to those in charge, out work your opponent, and stay focused. Is your team working on that winning formula?

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (12-11-17)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Popular television star Chip Gaines from the show Fixer Upper was quoted in People Magazine as saying, "I'd rather be missed than the idea of someone tiring of me." This has been his philosophy in life.

This quote might be a good way for a student-athlete to have a teacher or coach view his/her time spent in the classroom and on the court or field of play.

In other words, you want to make the type of impact on your classmates and teammates that leaves a long and lasting positive impression – not one where people tire of you and want you to go away.

Think about your actions on and off the field. Make the right choices and leave your school with a legacy you will be proud of.

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (12-4-17)

"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Wisconsin linebacker Garrett Dooley was quoted in the Indy Star as saying, "If you have a bad play, you have to forget about it. I think this year we've done a really good job of forgetting about last season and moving forward, preparing every single week."

In all sports and in most games or matches, there comes a time when you must move on from a bad play, a bad call, or an unlucky break. Are you capable of doing so?

Although there is no simple answer on how to move on, I will suggest that controlling your emotions is the key. Having a short-term memory on a bad play or tough call will help get you focused and keep your emotions intact on the next play.

Athletes who can concentrate on the play ahead instead of looking back will be the ones that are the most successful!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (11-27-17)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

How was your Thanksgiving break? Did you have an opportunity to give your mind and body some rest? If you are playing a winter sport, a free day or two is very useful during this time of year.

However, now is the time to buckle down again. Don't slack in the classroom. Make it a point to pay close attention to your grades, you only have a few weeks until winter break.

Is your team off to a good start in November? Don't slack on the court, in the pool, or the wrestling room. Strive to improve daily. The season flies by so quickly and you don't want to look back when it's over with any regrets.

Preparation today provides positive results tomorrow. Make sure that you are doing your part every day to improve yourself and your teammates. Those that don't may find themselves falling behind with little or no time to catch up!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (11-13-17)

"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

How is your preparation and concentration during the week of a game? Do you pay attention to your coaches and what they expect of you? If so, is that really good enough?

Jeff Saturday, an ESPN commentator and former NFL player summed it up this way when talking about his former position coach, line coach Howard Mudd. Saturday said that Coach Mudd always expressed one thing to the players he mentored. "I expect you to play better than I coach you."

As a player, it's your responsibility to plan, prepare, and perform. Even if parents, fans, or teammates want to point fingers if you lose, make sure that you have prepared to the best of your ability.

Strive to exceed the expectations of your coach. By doing so, you will never have anything to be ashamed of, win or lose!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (10-30-17)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

While reading the sports page the last few weeks, I couldn't help but notice how close the scores were during the volleyball state tournament run. But in reality, that's true in all sports. The farther you advance during the tournament, the tougher the games become.

Which brings me to this conclusion. The points scored at the beginning of each game are just as important as those scored late in the contest. In other words, don't beat yourself up if you happen to be the one that makes a crucial mistake at the end of the game.

Every play is important. Every mistake is important. Every point is important. The truth is, however, that most players, fans, and friends remember the last few plays, and not those that happen throughout the entire game.

When you have a teammate that happens to make a crucial mistake at the wrong time or late in the game, please remind them it was just one play. The final score is always determined by Every Play during the entire match, meet, or game!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (10-9-17)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Student-athletes can shine in a variety of ways. It's not always about touchdowns, points scored, or a fast time. In fact, it's much more than that. How do you make a difference in your community?

Houston Texans rookie quarterback Deshaun Watson did just that by contributing his first professional paycheck to the support staff of his team. They had lost all of their belongings during the recent hurricane. So yes, he gave up something he had looked forward to for a lifetime, his first pro paycheck, to help those that help him every day.

For a high school student to make a difference or show an act of kindness, it might be a "good morning" to another student, or a "thank you" to a custodian, a show of respect to those in charge, or a smile when things are going tough. Are your actions showing that you are a caring and giving person?

There's nothing more rewarding than making someone else happy. Make sure you try to do so every day in your actions and words!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (10-2-17)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Playing sports can be rewarding and frustrating. It's actually a microcosm of life. You will always be faced with challenges and trying to come up with solutions to solve those challenges.

One thing is for sure: there will be more delayed gratification than most prefer. During your freshman and sophomore year, your progress takes patience and time. Those small steps of improvement and development aren't always rewarded.

Can you remain patient? Most high school student-athletes won't reach their full potential until their junior or senior seasons. It's very challenging to wait for that opportunity. The competition gets tougher and tougher. The workouts are harder and harder.

Those that make it through and end up participating in junior varsity and varsity sports will look back someday and realize more gratification and enjoyment than you ever experienced while you were participating. The lessons learned will influence you more than you ever expected!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (9-25-17)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

How do you respond as an athlete when things aren't going well for you? How do you act when you are demoted or you aren't playing as much as you wish? Are you still happy to be a part of the team, or do you put yourself first and continue to think that you deserve more than your coach is giving you?

Do you quit or stick it out? While I know that it is very difficult to practice hard and give it your all, you can still be important to your team in a supporting role.

In life, you will be challenged with these same decisions when things aren't going well.  Will you quit, or will you stick it out? Those who stay involved for the long haul won't win every battle, but having the right attitude and never quit persona will serve you much better than quitting!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (9-18-17)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

Today, more than ever, it's so important for the student-athlete to understand what is expected of them, both in the classroom and field of play, and want to accomplish those expectations. (There are so many outside influences by personal trainers, tutors and parents.)

How well do you analyze your teachers and coaches? Do you know their expectations? Are you flexible and try to fit in, or are you defiant and want to do things your way?

The student-athlete who truly understands what is expected of them has the greatest chance of achievement.

Instead of worrying about what's best for you, think in a different way. Think about what you must do in order to impress your teachers and coaches, thus giving you a greater opportunity for success!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (9-11-17)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

A wise coach once said that it's just as tough to handle success as it is to handle failure.

One current star, professional golfer Jordan Spieth, seems to understand the importance of humility in the midst of his success.

When asked about the importance of humility in a recent Golf Digest article, Spieth replied by saying "my speaking about humility is very difficult, because that wouldn't be humility.”

A student-athlete who understands this lets other people do the talking about who's good and who's not. Tooting your own horn can cause a problem bigger than a major traffic jam!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

IHSAA Student-Athlete Tip of the Week (9-4-17)
"Promoting education based athletics in Indiana"

With the new school year in full bloom and fall sports taking shape, are you doing a good job of prioritizing what your goals are for this school year? Is it different than last year? What did you learn last year that is guiding your decision making so far this year?

Having been in your shoes before, and speaking on behalf of many other athletes and coaches, your order of priority, when it comes to being a successful student-athlete, should be the following:

First comes the classroom and your academic progress (Develop great study habits). Second, dedicate yourself to the sport you are presently playing or plan to play. Third, balance your social life and social activities (Sacrifices need to be made).

The student-athletes that do the best job of balancing these three different challenges have the best chance of becoming the student-athletes that teachers, high school coaches, and potential college coaches admire the most!

All content property of Billy Shepherd Sports

 



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